Occuponics Perform at #NatGat (Occupy National Gathering)


The Occuponics had the pleasure of providing music for Occupy’s first National Gathering, AKA #NatGat, which happened this past week in Philadelphia.

Thanks to vidographer  for recording this free form performance of the song called “#Natgat: In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love.” This performance was recorded the night of July 3rd, in Franklin Square. Featuring Stephen C. Baldwin on guitar and vocal, Paul Stein on melodica, and Carlos Mandelbaum (AKA David Intrator) on saxophone.

#NATGAT (City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love)

They call it NatGat
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
NatGat
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Down at Franklin Square
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
We’re gathering there
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love

You need a good spot
In the Quaker Friends parking lot
Down at NatGat
Is in the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Cause every hep cat
Is in the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Down at NatGat
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love

It’s a vision thing
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
It’s imagining
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Another world’s way
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
And a better day
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love

It’s not for fat cats
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
But it’s where it’s at
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
National gathering, it’s a happening
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Weird weather, all together
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love

Yeah, it’s NatGat
In the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
It’s where it’s at, in the City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love

City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
City of Brotherly and Sisterly Love
City of Love/City of Love
City of Love/City of Love

Lyrics c. 2012 Stephen C. Baldwin

Occuponics Perform “I Don’t Know But I’ve Been Told” (Animal Rights Version) at National Animal Rights Day

The Occuponics, with Occupy Sax Man and Guitarmy plus OWS Pulse drummers, rocked the 2nd annual National Animal Rights Day gathering in Union Square North on Sunday, June 3, 2012.

In the video below, the band performs a special version of the Occuponics’ “I Don’t Know But I’ve Been Told,” which includes the lyrics: “I don’t know but I can see all God’s creatures want to be free,” and “I don’t know but I think it’s time to protect the planet from corporate crime.”

Thanks to videographer rrrina for getting this performance down on tape!

Occuponics at Union Square North: Dancing In The Rain

The Occuponics – along with The OWS Sax Man, Guitarmy and the OWS Pulse Drum Circle – provided musical support to the second annual Animal Rights Day ceremony in Union Square Park this past Sunday, June 3rd. Toward the end of our concert, it began to rain, but folks kept right on dancing, and this short video captures of the magic of dancing in the rain!

GUITARMY In The “Freedom Cage,” May 5th, 2012

Braced by its success on May Day, Occupy Guitarmy made its way to Federal Hall this past Saturday to jam on the steps of the building where the Bill of Rights is housed, guarded by General George Washington. One-half of these steps has been designated by federal authorities as a “First Amendment Area,” and this small space, ringed by barricades, has been dubbed “the Freedom Cage” by demonstrators.

Here, the GUITARMY jams on a chant-oriented song loosely based on the Pointer Sisters’ 1972 hit, “I’ll Take You There.” The Guitarmy version simplifies the song to a C-F chord progression, accompanied by whatever lyrics are on protesters’ minds at the moment.

NOTE: THIS IS A FIELD VIDEO RECORDING AND WAS UPLOADED WITHOUT EDITING. The music begins about 25 minutes in.

The really cool part is when that gang of high-schoolers comes through and cheers. That truly made everyone’s day.



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Occuponics, at Federal Hall, Play “Wall Street, Your Kingdom Must Come Down”


The Occuponics perform “Wall Street Your Kingdom Must Come Down,” a song based on an old gospel song that was taught to the group by Painless Parker, AKA Noam Berg, back in November of 2011.

This song is regularly performed by The Occuponics because it is so aligned with the charter of the band to be “inclusive and participatory.” The song allows people listening to it to sing along with each verse and also to interactively contribute lines to it. It’s also easy to teach to other instrumentalists, because if follows a very simple Dm to A7 to Gm chord progression.

This recording of the song, captured by videographer CocoAndBrownie, includes lyrics calling out Monsanto, Fox News, Rupert Murdoch, as well as unspecified “plutocrats.” The guitarist vocalist is Stephen Carl Baldwin, accompanied by Carlos Mandelbaum on tenor saxophone.

 

Musically Occupying Wall Street, April 19, 2012

The Occuponics’ Steve Baldwin, with Carlos Mandelbaum on sax, lead a micro-march on Wall Street before historic Federal Hall. The song is “Wall Street, Your Kingdom Must Come Down,” which was taught to the group back in November 2011 by Painless Parker, AKA Noam Berg. Thanks to Jennifer Maskell for getting our procession on tape. The acoustics at Federal Hall are excellent, and the band will attempt to play down there as much as possible.

Carlos Mandelbaum on Occupy Wall Street and Harvard Men For Economic Justice

Our friend and fellow musician Carlos Mandelbaum expounds on Occupy Wall Street in this video, recorded by Allegra Culpepper, at Union Square on Saturday, March 24. You can avail yourself of more of Carlos’ thought-provoking views at his site, http://www.carnivalofideas.com.

Occuponics: “This Park Is Your Park!”: American Spring Concert, 3/22/2012

The Occuponics jam with the renowned Carlos Mandelbaum at Union Square Park, NY, playing “This Park Is Your Mark,” a slightly modified version of Woody Guthrie’s classic “This Land Is Your Land.”

One of the great joys of playing folk music is that this kind of music, by definition, is subject to modification as times change. Like the United States Constitution, folk songs are “living documents” which belong to the people and can be modified to their current needs.